From the editor:

Thankful hearts

Sept. 26, 2018

This is going to be short. Thank you. Thank you to every researcher, doctor, engineer, nurse, scientist, teacher, funder and anyone who has had anything to do with medical discovery and care. Where would any of us be without the dedication of those who relentlessly pursue medical innovations and treatment?

I’m currently sitting in a hospital room (as a family member, not the patient) being eternally grateful for those who had anything to do with the discoveries that allow for heart surgeries. Without brilliant minds determined to find ways to do the impossible, there would be no bypass machines, medicines, treatments and all of the other things that are needed to save lives. When it’s my beloved dad they’re saving, I’m especially aware of all the thanks I need to be offering.

MSU’s new Institute for Quantitative Health Science and Engineering was created to focus on finding more creative solutions for better diagnosis and treatments to improve health and eliminate disease. IQ brings together experts from different fields to collaborate on new ideas and research. You can read more about the awesome work being done at IQ in the MSUTODAY FEATURE, Brave new medical discoveries. It can never be said enough. Thank you. Thank you to all who are a part of this incredible venture to find solutions for families like mine no matter what medical challenge they’re facing.

Thank you, Chris Contag for leading this effort. He is the director of IQ and committed to pushing the envelope in medical discoveries. Read his FACULTY VOICE: Revolutionizing health care, to learn more about his work and listen to a podcast to hear him discuss it.

And where would any of us be without the fresh enthusiasm and determination of young students pursuing careers as researchers and doctors? Thank you, Lauren Turner, for choosing a path that saves lives. She is a medical student in the College of Osteopathic Medicine and has a passion for neuroscience. Read her STUDENT VIEW: Helping patients, to learn more about this future Spartan doc.

Here at MSU, we’re making discoveries every day that have lasting impact on the future of health care. Just last week, it was reported that one of our pediatric researchers and a Spectrum Health physician identified a new genetic syndrome in a 3-year-old girl who, for more than two years, has gone undiagnosed. Imagine the gratitude her family is feeling toward him. Read more about the breakthrough in the The MSUTODAY ARTICLE: New genetic syndrome identified in 3-year-old patient.

Again, thank you. A million thanks from a grateful heart who knows how important it is to have Spartans, and others, including my own sister, relentlessly working to make a difference and save lives. #SpartansWill.

Lisa Mulcrone
Editor, MSUToday
twitter bird@LMulcrone

Photo: I found this leaf while walking around the hospital perimeter. I'm taking it as a positive sign.