MSUToday
Published: June 20, 2018

FRIB and NSCL open house set for August 18

Contact(s): Karen King Facility for Rare Isotope Beams office: 517-908-7262 kingk@frib.msu.edu

The public can get a sneak peek behind-the-scenes at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB, and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, or NSCL, during an open house on Saturday, Aug. 18. The event will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with last tours starting at 4 p.m.

The open house is free, open to all ages and no appointment is necessary to participate.

At the event, visitors have the opportunity to:

  • view progress made in the establishment of FRIB.
  • tour operational experimental areas in NSCL that will be used in FRIB experiments.
  • explore the fields of FRIB and NSCL research with several hands-on activities and demonstrations.
  • meet nuclear scientists as they talk about their work on the frontiers of rare-isotope research.

Michigan State University is establishing FRIB as a scientific user facility for the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Operation of NSCL as a national user facility is supported by the Physics Division of the U.S. National Science Foundation.

MSU is committed to providing equal opportunity for participation in all programs, services, and activities. Accommodations for persons with disabilities may be requested in advance by contacting Alexa Allen at 517-908-7801 or events@frib.msu.edu by Friday, 17 August. Requests received after this date will be honored whenever possible.

Free parking will be available in the Shaw Lane and Wharton Center parking ramps. The Wharton Center ramp is closest to the FRIB tour, and the Shaw Lane ramp is closest to the NSCL tour and other activities. Handicap parking will be available near the event entrances. 

Visit frib.msu.edu/openhouse2018 for the most up-to-date information as the event date approaches or send questions to events@frib.msu.edu.

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