MSUToday
Published: Aug. 21, 2018

FRIB and NSCL open house brings in big crowds

By: Karen King Facility for Rare Isotope Beams office: 517-908-7262 kingk@frib.msu.edu

More than 4,000 members of the public toured the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory during the open house on Aug. 18. 

The event included activities, demonstrations, presentations and tours that allowed attendees to learn more about a world-leading science facility in operation, NSCL, and one in the making, FRIB.

The six-hour open house, made possible by 150 volunteers, offered an array of experiences for all ages. 

Tours took place in the currently operational experimental areas in NSCL that will be used in FRIB experiments, and visitors could tour the FRIB linear accelerator currently under construction.

Several hands-on activities and demonstrations showed the fields of FRIB and NSCL research, including a 3D model of the FRIB facility under construction, the “Isotopolis” video game, coloring pages and activity sheets related to nuclear astrophysics, safety equipment to wear, magnetic marbles to practice “smashing nuclei” and much more. Additionally, scientists were on-hand to talk about their work on the frontiers of rare-isotope research, and several educational videos were shown in the "FRIB Theater."

In the lecture hall, speakers gave presentations that gave a behind-the-scenes look at the FRIB Laboratory, the science being explored and career opportunities for young people.

Michigan State University is establishing FRIB as a scientific user facility for the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Operation of NSCL as a national user facility is supported by the Physics Division of the U.S. National Science Foundation.

For photos of the event, visit the photo gallery on the FRIB website.

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