MSUToday
Published: Dec. 6, 2018

Amalfitano recommended as dean of College of Osteopathic Medicine

Contact(s): Laura Probyn College of Osteopathic Medicine office: (517) 884-3755 laura.probyn@hc.msu.edu, Sarina Gleason Media Communications office: (517) 355-9742 sarina.gleason@cabs.msu.edu

Andrea Amalfitano has been recommended to serve as dean of Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. He has served as the interim dean for the college since Feb. 16.

If approved by the MSU Board of Trustees, the appointment will be effective Dec. 14.

Previously, Amalfitano was director of MSU’s Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, professor of microbiology and molecular genetics and pediatrics, and held the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation Endowed Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics.

Prior to joining MSU in 2005, he served as an associate professor at Duke University in the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Pathology, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology.

“Dr. Amalfitano had the strong support of his faculty from all three campuses, students, university and faculty leadership, and statewide stakeholders as he shared his vision for the college during the interview process,” said MSU Provost June Pierce Youatt. “He is eager to take on the challenges of curriculum revision, enhance student support, expand the college’s research agenda, and create deeper relationships with our hospital partners.”

Amalfitano earned a bachelor of science in microbiology in 1984 and a Ph.D. in microbiology in 1989, both from Michigan State University. He earned his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, or D.O., medical degree in 1990 from MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine’s D.O./Ph.D. dual-degree program.

His research focuses on determining the feasibility of cutting-edge therapeutics, including gene transfer, to treat both acquired and genetic diseases and then translating that knowledge into the clinical realm. His scholarly efforts in both clinical medicine and applied genetics have led to the development of innovative treatments for infants, children and adults affected by a variety of diseases, including lethal muscular dystrophies, cancer, autoimmune disorders and autism.

“I can’t imagine a greater honor than leading the college that gave me my start in osteopathic medicine,” Amalfitano said. “This college prepares outstanding physicians, and I plan to focus on building an even better student experience, strengthening our already impressive faculty research portfolio and working with our colleagues in the university’s health colleges to provide exceptional clinical care.”

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