Published: Aug. 15, 2012

MSU speaker series to examine development of sexual orientation

Contact(s): Tom Oswald Media Communications office: (517) 432-0920 cell: (517) 281-7129 Tom.Oswald@cabs.msu.edu, Marc Breedlove Neuroscience Program office: (517) 355-1749 breedsm@msu.edu

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Michigan State University will host a speaker series this fall examining the issue of whether sexual orientation is determined before birth.

The series is titled “Whom You Love: The Biology of Sexual Orientation.” It will feature a number of national experts who will discuss the scientific evidence that processes at work before birth influence the development of sexual orientation.

The lectures will be held at 4 p.m. every Monday, starting Sept. 10 and running through Dec. 10, in Room 115B Wells Hall.

Providing funding for the series are the MSU Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives, the College of Human Medicine, Lyman Briggs College, the LBGT Resource Center and the Neuroscience Program.

“Scientific findings over the past 15 years or so have built a solid case that events and processes at work before birth have an influence on whether a person will grow up to be gay or straight,” said Marc Breedlove, director of the MSU Neuroscience Program and organizer of the series. “We want to bring that information together in a format that everyone can understand so they can see that nature has a say in whom you love.”

For more on the series, including a list of speakers as well as information on a documentary that Breedlove is developing on the subject, visit www.whomyoulove.com/.

###

Michigan State University has been working to advance the common good in uncommon ways for more than 150 years. One of the top research universities in the world, MSU focuses its vast resources on creating solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges, while providing life-changing opportunities to a diverse and inclusive academic community through more than 200 programs of study in 17 degree-granting colleges.

From the archives