MSUToday
Published: Feb. 11, 2019

American classic ‘Oklahoma!’ comes to MSU

Contact(s): Brian de Vries office: (517)‐355‐6690 devri124@msu.edu

The Department of Theatre at Michigan State University presents “Oklahoma!” from Feb. 15 to 24 in the Fairchild Theater. 

“Oklahoma!,” an American classic, boasts a 25-person cast, the Orchesis dance company and an 16-piece orchestra.

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s first collaboration remains, in many ways, their most innovative, having set the standards and established the rules of musical theater still being followed today.  

Set in a Western Indian territory just after the turn of the century, the high-spirited rivalry between the local farmers and cowboys provides the colorful background against which Curly, a handsome cowboy, and Laurey, a winsome farm girl, play out their love story. Although the road to true love never runs smooth, with these two headstrong romantics holding the reins, love’s journey is as bumpy as a surrey ride down a country road. That they will succeed in making a new life together we have no doubt, and that this new life will begin in a brand-new state provides the ultimate climax to the triumphant “Oklahoma!”.

Show times:

  • 8 p.m., Feb. 15
  • 8 p.m., Feb. 16 
  • 2 p.m., Feb. 17, with a pre-show discussion with the director at 1:15 p.m.
  • 7:30 p.m., Feb. 19 
  • 7:30 p.m., Feb. 20 
  • 7:30 p.m., Feb. 21, with a post-show discussion following the performance
  • 8 p.m., Feb. 22 
  • 2 p.m., Feb. 23 
  • 8 p.m., Feb. 23 
  • 2 p.m., Feb. 24 

Tickets are $22 for general admission, $20 for seniors and faculty and $10 for children 12 and under.

Tickets may be purchased from the Wharton Center Box Office, 1.800.WHARTON and online.

For more information, click here.

Set in a Western Indian territory just after the turn of the century, the high-spirited rivalry between the local farmers and cowboys provides the colorful background against which Curly, a handsome cowboy, and Laurey, a winsome farm girl, play out their love story.

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