MSUToday
Published: June 22, 2018

Celebration planned to commemorate anniversary of FDA approving anti-cancer drug

Contact(s): Val Osowski College of Natural Science office: (517) 432-4561 osowskiv@msu.edu, Layne Cameron Media Communications office: (517) 353-8819 cell: (765) 748-4827 Layne.Cameron@cabs.msu.edu

On Aug. 3-4, Michigan State University’s Department of Chemistry will commemorate the 40th anniversary of the FDA approving the anti-cancer drug, cisplatin. The celebration will showcase some of MSU’s latest cancer research advances in precision nanomedicine, medicinal chemistry and the metabolic regulation of this complex disease.

Cisplatin treatment was discovered at MSU in the mid-to-late 1960s by Barnett Rosenberg and colleagues Loretta Van Camp and Thomas Krigas. It was approved by the FDA in 1978, revolutionizing the treatment of certain cancers, especially testicular, bladder, lung and stomach cancers and saving countless lives.

Cisplatin, and its close analog carboplatin, is known to be the “penicillin of cancer drugs” because it has been one of the first, most widely prescribed and most effective treatment for many cancer diagnoses.

The two-day event will include a reception and cancer research presentations on Friday evening, followed by an all-day symposium on Saturday that features prominent scientists and experts in the cisplatin/carboplatin field.

There will also be presentations from nationally renowned MSU faculty members who will share some of the latest cancer research advances in precision nanomedicine, medicinal chemistry and the metabolic regulation of this complex disease.

The event is free, however, registration is required. For more information about the event and/or to register, visit https://www.chemistry.msu.edu/cisplatin/.

Cisplatin was discovered at MSU in the mid-to-late 1960s by Barnett Rosenberg and colleagues Loretta Van Camp and Thomas Krigas. It was approved by the FDA in 1978. Photo courtesy of Jim Hoeschele.

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