MSUToday
Published: Sept. 12, 2017

Fighting Parkinson's

Contact(s): Sarina Gleason Media Communications office: (517) 355-9742 sarina.gleason@cabs.msu.edu

Michigan State University is taking a lead in fighting Parkinson's disease. In two recent studies, Spartan researchers have found new ways that could predict Parkinson's and slow its progression.

One new study provides further evidence that a simple scratch-and-sniff test could predict Parkinson’s disease even earlier than previously thought.

According to MSU researcher Honglei Chen, lead author and professor of epidemiology, the test could potentially identify certain people who are at an increased risk of developing the disease up to 10 years before they are actually diagnosed. Previous research has shown an association between sense of smell and disease progression of up to four to five years. Read more >>

MSU scientists also have early proof that an antidepressant drug that’s been around for more than 50 years could slow the progression of Parkinson’s.

In a proof-of-concept study, published in the journal Neurobiology of Disease, the drug nortriptyline, which has been used to treat depression and nerve pain, stopped the growth of abnormal proteins that can build up in the brain and lead to the development of the disease. Read more >>

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