Published: April 24, 2014

MSU Symphony Orchestra and choral groups to perform April 26

Contact(s): Kathleen Adams College of Music office: (517) 353-9958 adamsk10@msu.edu

Offering a big finish to the 2013-14 season and academic year, Michigan State University’s Symphony Orchestra, University Chorale, State Singers and Choral Union will perform Gustav Mahler’s magnificent Symphony No. 2, dubbed the Resurrection Symphony.

Mahler’s well-known piece resonates with audiences by telling a beautiful story of the afterlife. The performance is scheduled for 8 p.m. April 26 in Wharton Center’s Cobb Great Hall.

Mahler, who began work on this, his second symphony, was at a point in his life where he was asking – To what purpose do we live? So at age 27, Resurrection began Mahler’s journey to find an answer to his question and brought the composer fame when it premiered in Berlin in 1895. He created a symphony written for an orchestra, a mixed choir, and two soloists, organ, and offstage ensemble of brass and percussion.

To support such a large work, nearly 300 musicians will take the stage, including the orchestra, which is made up of 110 members; the 55-member University Chorale; State Singers with 50 members; and the 90 choristers that make up the Choral Union. Melanie Helton, soprano, and Jennifer Johnson Cano, mezzo-soprano, are guest soloists.

The Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Kevin Noe, is comprised of the most developed musicians at the College of Music.

Admission is free for students with ID and anyone under age 18. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors (age 60 and older), and can be purchased online, at the College of Music box office by calling (517) 353-5340, or in person (333 W. Circle Drive, East Lansing) or at the Wharton Center box office by calling (800) WHARTON or (517) 432- 2000.

There will be a $3 restoration fee for tickets purchased at Wharton Center, via phone, box office or the website. This is not a College of Music fee.

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