Published: Feb. 2, 2009

MSU, WJR and MLive.com partnering to promote 'green' efforts

Contact(s): Bridget Burns WJR Radio office: (313) 873-9735 bridget.burns@citcomm.com

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Michigan State University, News/Talk 760 WJR, and MLive.com are partnering to more broadly communicate sustainability efforts in the Great Lakes region.

 

MSU and Detroit radio station WJR are currently collaborating on “Greening of the Great Lakes,” a Web site and radio program that focus on environmental, economic and social sustainability. This partnership will expand to include direct links to MLive.com’s environmental page at www.MLive.com/environment.

 

“This outstanding partnership between WJR and MSU has not only created a place where listeners can go to find extensive resources for those interested in living an environmentally friendly lifestyle,” said WJR President and General Manager Mike Fezzey. “Adding  MLive.com to ‘Greening of the Great Lakes’ will help spread news and information to more people and keep the Web site and show on the cutting edge of environmentally related issues.”  

 

The radio program, heard Fridays from 7 to 8 p.m. on WJR (760 AM), explores myriad issues related to sustainability. Topics range from the construction of "green" buildings to the development of energy-efficient automobiles to the creation of the biofuels that will help power autos and buildings of the future. 

                                                

MLive.com is Michigan’s No. 1 local news and information Web site with 1.6 million users. Its large local audience and affiliation with eight daily and 34 weekly newspapers should increase awareness for the Greening of the Great Lakes Radio program, MSU and WJR.

 

“Our environmental page has a sizeable following already,” said Bill Emkow, MLive.com’s editor-in-chief. “Now we want to add multimedia and a blog to encourage our reading community to interact with us. We want to be the best place for environmental news in the state of Michigan.”

 

The program’s host, Kirk Heinze, served in MSU’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for three decades as a faculty member, a department chairperson and, most recently, as director of Agriculture and Natural Resources Communications.

 

“We thoughtfully consider such critical issues as land use, water quality, alternative energy, biotechnology and organic agriculture,” Heinze said. “We talk with experts who have varying perspectives on these issues, and our listeners form their own judgments based on what they hear.

 

I’m very excited that we will have access to MLive.com’s many readers and the opportunity to expose even more people to some of the most important issues of our time.”

 

Heinze will share his thoughts in a blog at MLive.com’s environmental home page, and his staff will provide audio and video content from the show to MLive.com.

 

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Michigan State University has been advancing knowledge and transforming lives through innovative teaching, research and outreach for more than 150 years. MSU is known internationally as a major public university with global reach and extraordinary impact. Its 17 degree-granting colleges attract scholars worldwide who are interested in combining education with practical problem solving.

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